Interactive Design, Lecture Notes

Persona Profiles

USER PERSONA

A user persona is the development of a fictional character who is a representative of the intended audience. The purpose follows to reflect the goals and behaviour of the hypothetical users to help designers visualise the user experience.

Some of the fundamental questions that need to be considered when creating user personas include:

   What are the tasks the user is trying to perform?

            Are there different tasks for different personas?

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Interactive Design, Lecture Notes

Introduction to Design Patterns

Design patterns are a principle which solves common design problems through conventions developed in terms of user interface and page composition. They should be employed in the right situation, not used merely because it’s the norm. How it is received is dependent on the problem and whether it is the correct resolution or not.

The basic design patterns include:

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Interactive Design, Lecture Notes

Importance of Design Process and Context

The design process should not be overlooked as it provides the designer with insights to their production. In fact, it is during this progression where they fully develop their existing ideas as well as promoting new ones. Bill Verplank breaks this process down into 8 simple phases.

Error – Idea ­– Metaphor – Scenario – Task – Model – Representation (Prototype) – Manipulation (Interaction)

Through these early developments, it helps the designer to understand, define and frame what needs to be solved and how to overcome it. For example, using a context scenario allows the designer to observe and comprehend the situation, the people and their needs in order to successfully reach their goal.

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Classwork, Interactive Design

UI Flow Diagram

Utilising a UI flow diagram is another useful tool to visualise an interactive product. It maps out all the pages needed to be included as well as important details such as navigation buttons, titles, rough image placements etc. As mentioned before, for a designer, being able to analyse a structured diagram helps them notice what elements are missing.

Below is an example. (‘How To Make Toast’ cont.)

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Classwork, Interactive Design

Back to the Storyboard

Like flowcharts, employing storyboards is an excellent tool for developing an interactive design product. It provides a visual representation of what is envisioned, which allows the designer to realise any complications and improve their idea.

Below is an example of a simple storyboard on ‘How to Make Toast’.

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Classwork, Interactive Design

Basics of Flowcharting

Flowcharts are an important tool within the process of interactive design. It visually represents the directions of a conceptual problem and its solution. Prior to creating the flowchart, it is imperative to produce a written procedure to ensure no crucial details are forgotten.

Below is an example on ‘How To Make Toast’.

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